April 2010 Section Meeting Information

The UC Robotics Team

DATE: Thursday, April 22, 2010
PLACE : Raffel’s – 10160 Reading Road (see below for directions)
TIME : 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. –  Social Time
            6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. –  Dinner
            7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. –  Presentation
COST FOR DINNER: $10.00 per person – Regardless of Membership or Membership Grade!

NOTE:  DINNERS ARE ALWAYS OPTIONAL – YOU MAY ATTEND THE PROGRAM ONLY. 

MENU SELECTIONS:   Asparagus Spears in a fresh cream sauce served on toast points, Hot Sliced Roast Beef in Gravy, Parmesan Chicken Breast, Zucchini Carrot Dressing, Buttered Noodles, Sautéed Vegetables, Tossed Salad, Dinner Rolls and Butter.  There is also a bar available for the purchase of alcoholic drinks.

LOCATION:  Raffel’s is located at 10160 Reading Road, south of Glendale-Milford Road on the east side of Reading. Take I-75 to the Glendale-Milford Rd. Exit, go east on Glendale-Milford Road approximately ¾ of a mile to Reading Rd. and turn right on Reading.

RESERVATIONS:  Please email Fred Nadeau for reservations at Reservations@ieeeCincinnati.org (preferred) or call the Section Voice Mail at 513-629-9380 by Noon, Tuesday, April 20, 2010 if you plan to attend. Please leave your Name, IEEE Member Number, and a daytime telephone number.

PE CREDITS: Depending on the subject matter, attendance at IEEE Cincinnati Section Meetings now qualifies the attendee for Professional Development Hours towards renewal of Professional Engineers Licenses. Required documentation will be available following the meeting!  The Section Meetings also provide a great opportunity to network with fellow engineers in the area.

ABOUT THE MEETING:  The Robotics Team of the University of Cincinnati College of Engineering and Applied Sciences will be competing in two events this year: the 18th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition and the 7th Annual ION Robot Lawn Mower Competition.  Mark McCrate, a graduate student studying Mechanical Engineering, and Josh Casey, a senior studying Computer Science, will give a presentation about the Robotics Team and their entries in the two competitions.  Hardware related topics will include building the robot, design iterations, laser scanners, stereo vision, GPS, and E-Stop designs.  Software related topics will include Kalman filtering, cell decomposition, dynamic obstacle avoidance, path planning and computer interfacing.  Depending on time constraints, other team/club activities and projects will be presented as well.  Your questions are welcomed during this highly interactive presentation. 

Note: the Section has provided $250 towards the UC Foundation Urban Challenge Fund which helps fund the activities of the Robotics Team.

April 2010 Membership News

NEW MEMBERS
The following individuals are IEEE members who are new to our Section:

Michael Bell 
Robert Brown 
Eric Glossner 
Daniel J. Habes 
Mathew D. Jenkins 
Andy Keith 
David W. Leech 
Hao Luan
Tao Ma
Jamie N. McGlothin
James Murphy
Rick Salem
George M. Shiekh
Elizabeth A. Spurlock
Joshua Terrel
Brain Waring

We wish to welcome these new members to the Cincinnati Section!!!

April 2010 History

Scanning the Past: A History of Electrical Engineering from the Past
Submitted by Marc Bell, Editor

Copyright 1996 IEEE. Reprinted with permission from the IEEE publication, “Scanning the Past” which covers a reprint of an article appearing in the Proceedings of the IEEE Vol. 84, No. 9, September 1996.

Sergei A. Schelkunoff and Antenna Theory

Fifty-five years ago this month, the PROCEEDINGS OF THE RADIO ENGINEERS (IRE) included a paper by Sergei A. Schelkunoff on the theory of antennas. At the time, he was a member of the research staff at the Bell Telephone Laboratories (BTL) where he worked for about three decades. (See Fig. 1.) Schelkunoff made important contributions to the theory of coaxial cables and wave guides as well as to antennas.

Schelkunoff was born in Samara, Russia, in 1897. He was a student at the University of Moscow when his education was interrupted by the outbreak of World War I. He served in the Russian Army during the War before corning to the United States by way of Manchuria and Japan in 1921. He learned English and received both the B.A. and M.A. degrees in mathematics at the State College of Washington (now Washington University), Seattle. He worked in the Engineering Department of the Western Electric Company during 1923-1925 and spent a few months at the BTL in 1926. He taught at the State College of Washington from 1926-1929 and received the Ph.D. degree in mathematics at Columbia University in 1928 before returning to research at BTL.

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Fig. 1.  Schelkunoff studying waveguide transmission in the early
1930’s.   (Reprinted from P. C. Mahon, Mission Communications:
 The Story of Bell Laboratories, 1975.)

One of Schelkunoffs early assignments was to investigate the theory of coaxial transmission lines. He published a paper on this topic in the Bell System Technical Journal in 1934. Subsequently, he studied the electromagnetic theory of wave guides for rnicrowaves and was coauthor with John R. Carson and Sallie P. Mead of a paper on that subject in the BSTJ in 1936. Schelkunoff s first IRE paper was on applications of the Summerfeld integral and appeared in the October 1936 PROCEEDINGS. He authored another IRE paper “Transrnission Theory of Pure Electromagnetic Waves,” published in November 1937. He treated the theory of spherical waves in a 1938 paper in the Transactions of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and followed this with a 1939 IRE paper on the induced electromotive force method of computing radiation from antennas. In his September 1941 IRE paper, Schelkunoff addressed the ambitious topic of the “theory of antennas of arbitrary size and shape.” He explained that his mathematical analysis of antennas was “precisely the analysis appropriate to wave guides and electric horns.” He observed that:

We may also think of the antennas as the wall of an electric horn with an aperture so wide that one can hardly see the horn itself-just like a Cheshire cat: only the grin can be seen.

Schelkunoff suggested that the physical picture which emerged from his mathematical analysis was “attractive to an engineer.” He began his analysis with Maxwell’s equations and hypothetical conical antennas and went on to show how to apply the results to antennas of other shapes although they were “definitely more complicated.” He concluded that he believed that “the antenna theory is in such a shape that accurate results can be calculated if all visible factors such as base capacitance and antenna shapes are taken into consideration.”

Schelkunoff was awarded the Morris Liebmann Memorial Prize by the IRE in 1942 and was elected a Fellow of IRE in 1944. During World War ll, he served as a technical consultant to the National Defense Research Committee and to the U.S. Navy. He authored Electromagnetic Waves (1943), Applied Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists (1948), and Advanced Antenna Theory (1952). He retired from BTL in 1960 and subsequently taught electrical engineering at Columbia University. He died in 1992 at age 95.

James E. Brittain
School of History , Technology and Society
Georgia Institute of Technology

April 2010 IEEE News

Former NAE President William Wulf Urges Scientists & Engineers to Revive Recommendations in ‘Gathering Storm’ in Speech to U.S. IEEE Members

NASHVILLE, TENN. (6 March 2010) — Scientists and engineers should encourage Congress to revive the recommendations outlined in the 2005 National Academies report, “Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future,” IEEE Fellow and former National Academy of Engineering President William A. Wulf said at the IEEE-USA Annual Meeting on Saturday morning.

“The momentum has clearly subsided,” Wulf said at the Nashville Airport Marriott. “If IEEE-USA and other societies get vocal about it, I think we can get the momentum back.”

A video of Wulf’s address will be posted at www.ieeeusa.org. Session recaps from the meeting are available at http://ieee-usa.blogspot.com/

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March 2010 – Section Meeting Details

Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS),
a Duke Energy Perspective on CO2

DATE: Thursday, March 25, 2010
PLACE : Raffel’s – 10160 Reading Road (see below for directions)
TIME : 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. –  Social Time
             6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. –  Dinner
             7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. –  Presentation
 

COST FOR DINNER: $10.00 per person – Regardless of Membership or Membership Grade!

NOTE:  DINNERS ARE ALWAYS OPTIONAL – YOU MAY ATTEND THE PROGRAM ONLY

MENU SELECTIONS:   Stuffed Pasta Shells, BBQ’d Ribs, Marinated Char Grilled Chicken Breast, Au Gratin Potatoes, Buttered Corn, Cole Slaw, Tossed Salad, Dinner Rolls and Butter, Coffee, Tea, Iced Tea, Soft Drinks. There is also a bar available for the purchase of alcoholic drinks.

LOCATION:  Raffel’s is located at 10160 Reading Road, south of Glendale-Milford Road on the east side of Reading. Take I-75 to the Glendale-Milford Rd. Exit, go east on Glendale-Milford Road approximately ¾ of a mile to Reading Rd. and turn right on Reading.

RESERVATIONS:  Please email Fred Nadeau for reservations at Reservations@ieeeCincinnati.org (preferred) or call the Section Voice Mail at 513-629-9380 by Noon, Tuesday, March 23, 2010 if you plan to attend. Please leave your Name, IEEE Member Number, and a daytime telephone number.

PE CREDITS: Depending on the subject matter, attendance at IEEE Cincinnati Section Meetings now qualifies the attendee for Professional Development Hours towards renewal of Professional Engineers Licenses. Required documentation will be available following the meeting!  The Section Meetings also provide a great opportunity to network with fellow engineers in the area.

ABOUT THE MEETING:  Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) provides a means to dramatically reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted into the atmosphere from industrial facilities or when electricity is generated by fossil fuel power plants. Although carbon dioxide is neither toxic nor inherently dangerous, the overabundance of atmospheric CO2  is believed to be a major contributor to global climate change.

Up until now, the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere has been inevitable when power is generated from fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas.  Now, however, new power plants are being designed with processes to separate carbon dioxide so that it is not released into the atmosphere. Instead, the CO2 is captured and can be piped to underground geological formations where it can be permanently sequestered.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:  John G. Bloemer of Duke Energy has over twenty-nine years in the Power Generation Industry, holding various positions in Engineering, Staff, and Management roles.  Positions held in the General Engineering, Resource Planning, Power Services, Business Development Support, and Analytical Engineering departments, with areas of responsibility covering System Protection, Integrated Resource Planning, Emissions Compliance Planning (both Phase I & Phase II CAAA and CAIR/CAMR), Rate Case, Fuel Clause & CPCN Support, and Generation Project Development and Siting technical support functions.  John is a Registered Professional Engineer in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Mr. Bloemer obtained an Associate of Applied Science in Electronics Technology and Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Northern Kentucky University, and a Master of Science, Electrical Engineering, MS(EE) from the University of Cincinnati.  He has also attended and presented at many industry related seminars and forums throughout career.

March 2010 – Membership News

NEW MEMBERS
The following individuals are IEEE members who are new to our Section:

Annie M. Avakian
Devin Christopher Cole
Justin Andrew Daniels
William Francis Harkins III
Daniel Holder
Catherine A. Huitger
Milo Wilt Hyde
Vasile Nistor
David Pruss
Michael Valentine
Philip Shaun Wheeler
Bryon Wilkins
Jia Yang

We wish to welcome these new members to the Cincinnati Section!!!

March 2010 – History

Scanning the Past: A History of Electrical Engineering from the Past
Submitted by Bob Morrison, Editor

Copyright 1996 IEEE. Reprinted with permission from the IEEE publication, “Scanning the Past” which covers a reprint of an article appearing in the Proceedings of the IEEE Vol. 84, No. 8, August 1996.

Semi J. Begun and Magnetic Recording

Fifty-five years ago this month, the PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS (IRE) included a paper by Semi J. Begun on magnetic recording and applications for radio broadcasting. At the time, the author was employed as a research engineer at the Brush Development Company in Cleveland, OH, where he worked from 1938 to 1971. He made numerous contributions to the technology of magnetic recording and was elected a Fellow of the IRE in 1952.

Begun was born in Danzig, Germany, in 1905. He received the Master’s degree from the Institute of Technology
in Berlin in 1929. He earned a doctorate from the same institution in 1933. In 1929 he joined the firm Schuchardt AG in Berlin, where he did developmental work on a steel magnetic recorder known as the Dailygraph, which is shown in Fig. 1. This machine featured a cartridge with two wire wheels and could be used in offices for taking dictation or to record telephone messages. In 1932, the International Telephone and Telegraph Company acquired Schuchardt AG and transferred magnetic recording research and development activities to Lorenz Ag, a subsidiary in Berlin. Begun directed a small group at Lorenz which began work on a steel tape recorder as an alternative to steel wire. The steel tape recorder developed by Begun and his group is shown in Fig. 2. However, the rise to power of Hitler and the National Socialists in Germany caused Begun to emigrate to the United States in 1935.

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Soon after his arrival in the United States, Begun and two associates organized the Magneton Company to manage his magnetic recording patents. Subsequently, the Brush Development Company negotiated a license agreement with Magneton and Begun was hired to lead a group at Brush devoted to the development of magnetic recorders. They worked on various types of wire, disk, and tape recorders although none achieved commercial success prior to the war. Fig. 3 illustrates an example of a steel tape endless loop recorder developed during 1939-1941.

In his August 1941 PROCEEDINGS paper, Begun reported that magnetic recording was already in use in Europe in the radio broadcasting field but not yet in the United States. He pointed out that magnetic recording permitted a time delay and was useful when repetition was necessary.  During World War II,  Begun contributed to the design of magnetic recorders for military applications including wire recorders for use in aircraft. He also did preliminary work on the use of paper or plastic tape coated with magnetic materials. This work was done with the assistance of the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M).

 

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After the war in 1946, the Brush Company began marketing the so-called “Soundmirror” which employed a paper tape with magnetic oxide coating. This model is shown in Fig. 4. Begun also worked on television and computer applications of magnetic recording before retiring from Brush in 1971.

After leaving Brush, he founded and served as President of Auctor Associates, a consulting firm in Cleveland. He participated in a study of the causes of violence carried out by The Society for Prevention of Violence and served as the President of the Society during 1989. He became a strong advocate of reforms in elementary education and urged the IEEE-USA to take a more active role in changing “an education system that has not responded with vigor to changing social conditions.” Begun died in 1995 at the age of 89.

James E. Brittain
School of History , Technology and Society
Georgia Institute of Technology

March 2010 – IEEE News

New IEEE-USA President Identifies Advancing Viability and Contributions
of the Profession as Top Priority for 2010

WASHINGTON (5 February 2010) — Evelyn H. Hirt, who became IEEE-USA president on 1 January, has identified advancing the viability and contributions of the profession as her top priority in 2010. Her concerns encompass the need for recognition of the significant role played by engineers in powering the U.S. economy, and for science, engineering and technical literacy to fuel the creation of future engineers and technical professionals.

“Engineers create jobs by providing systems, products and services through the application of mathematical and scientific principles to practical ends,” Hirt said. “It is this practical application that helps fuel the economy by furthering industrial and commercial objectives in advancing the design, construction and operation of economical and efficient structures, equipment and systems.”

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